Are Autistics empowered during pregnancy and labour in line with the ICPD?

Today (11th July 2020) is World Population Day which “this year calls for global attention to the unfinished business of the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development” (ICPD).[1]

The ICPD met in Cairo in 1994 and 179 governments adopted a Programme of Action relating to reproductive health and the empowerment of women. ICPD is “often used as a shorthand to refer to the global consensus that reproductive health and rights are human rights.”[2]

[Before I continue, I’d like to thank Hayley Morgan for her guidance and direction to some of the only academic articles out there regarding this matter.]

Despite this consensus, many Autistic women (and those non-binary and otherwise gendered people who have given birth), report that the support (or lack of) they received during pregnancy and birth from their medical teams was not reflective of their needs. A study of women with intellectual and developmental disabilities conducted in 2015 by Potvin, Brown and Cobigo found that a “high level of available support was not always perceived as beneficial” and that “social support is perceived as most effective when three conditions are met: (1) support is accessible, (2) support is provided by individuals expressing positive attitudes towards the pregnancy, and (3) autonomy is valued.”[3] The study concludes that there’s a lack of accessible information for developmentally disabled women, and that maternity care providers should “be aware of stigmatizing attitudes and respect the autonomy of pregnant women with IDD as they prepare for motherhood.”

For pregnant Autistics, not only is there a lack of accessible information for those who need it, there’s a lack of information full stop. If you Google ‘pregnant and Autistic’ or ‘Autistic pregnancy’ the results include a plethora of articles speculating about whether or not you can ‘prevent autism’, articles listing the ‘risk factors for having an Autistic child’, a small handful of academic research papers which are often behind paywalls, and (from the first 10 pages of the Google search results) a couple of articles containing the experiences of actually Autistic people who have experienced pregnancy and birth.

Pregnant people often spend at least some time researching what to expect during pregnancy and birth – there’s an abundance of books, articles, websites and forums highlighting this fact – yet pregnant Autistics and Autistic parents have been accused of Fabricated or Induced Illness due to the volume of research they have conducted and their use of medical – rather than colloquial – terminology in appointments. This is discussed in a 2017 article by The Guardian in which Autistic women report their experiences of motherhood including fears of putting “professionals’ backs up and [being] accused of causing or fabricating their children’s condition” and being “terrified their children will be removed from them if social workers misinterpret their autistic traits as indicating potential harm to the child.”[4]

It’s also reported that the experiences of pregnancy and birth for Autistics are quite different from their non-Autistic counterparts, and that sensory differences (for example) were dismissed as ‘not possible’ by their midwifery team. An article on Tommy’s (the miscarriage and baby loss charity) website features Rachel, an Autistic mum who has experienced multiple miscarriages. Rachel talks about how she (along with “many Autistic mothers”) are “very aware of their internal body state and knew things about their pregnancy before the textbooks said they should” which meant that she was more acutely aware of pregnancies she had lost in the early stages of conception. Rachel also discusses the difficulties Autistics have with processing pregnancy loss, and that “some may not process what has happened immediately or even within the weeks and months that follow the loss.” This processing delay coupled with reduced social networks reported by Autistics (corroborated by Potvin, Brown and Cobigo’s aforementioned study) contribute to the “isolation and detriment [pregnancy and baby loss] causes to mental health.”[5]

A study published in Women and Birth in 2017 explores the sensory differences reported by pregnant Autistics alongside other reported challenges they face. The review of current literature and its supplementary anecdotal evidence from blogs found that Autistic women “reported that they needed to feel more empowered about the circumstances of their giving birth and that they relied on three factors during their experience—clear communication, sensory adjustments and change management.” It highlights issues faced by Autistic people more generally – hospitals being noisy environments and touch which “may bewelcomed by many patients can be the cause of pain or distress for the [Autistic person].”[6]

Therefore, Autistic UK recommend that the needs of Autistic women, non-binary, and otherwise gendered people who give birth are reviewed and recognised in accordance with ICPD. Midwifery teams need to receive clear guidance and training from Autistics with lived experience in order to ensure the needs of all pregnant Autistics are recognised and met. There are a number of Autistic professionals with experience in this area, including Hayley Morgan MSc, who are able to provide talks and training regarding the Autistic experience of pregnancy and birth in order to achieve positive outcomes for both the Autistic person and their baby.

References

[1] United Nations (2020), ‘World Population Day July 11’ (Online) accessed 9th July 2020. Available at https://www.un.org/en/events/populationday/

[2] United Nations Population Fund (2019), ‘Explainer: What is the ICPD and why does it matter?’ (Online) accessed 9th July 2020. Available at https://www.un.org/en/events/populationday/

[3] Potvin, LA, Brown, HK & Cobigo, V (2016), ‘Social Support Received by Women With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities During Pregnancy and Childbirth: An Exploratory Qualitative Study’ Midwifery, Vol. 37, pp 57-64 (Online) accessed 9th July 2020. Available at https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27217238/

[4] Hill, A (2017) ‘Mothers with autism: ‘I mothered my children in a very different way’’ The Guardian (Online) accessed 9th July 2020. Available at https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2017/apr/15/women-autistic-mothers-undiagnosed-children

[5] Rachel (ND) ‘Recurrent miscarriage and being autistic’ Tommy’s (Online) accessed 9th July 2020. Available at https://www.tommys.org/our-organisation/help-and-support/baby-loss-stories/recurrent-miscarriage-and-being-autistic

[6] Rogers, C, Lepherd, L, Ganguly, R, & Jacob-Rogers, S (2017), ‘Perinatal issues for women with high functioning autism spectrum disorder’ Women and Birth Vol. 30 Iss. 2, pp e89-e95 (Online) accessed 9th July 2020. Available at https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1871519216301287

Statement regarding the Resignation of Autistic and Disabled MP Jared O’Mara from the Labour Party

The following is a statement regarding the resignation of autistic and disabled MP Jared O’Mara from the Labour Party. This comes shortly after his reinstatement after being temporarily banned from the party after allegations were made of homophobia and misogyny online.

[A link to the BBC article concerning this can be found here.]

It is true that disabled people, autistic people, and people who fit into the wider neurodiversity umbrella – are not given a voice within UK politics as a whole. Mental health, too, is a topic only recently brought into discussion.

For this reason and this reason only, it is a shame to see a disabled and autistic member of parliament resign from their party.

Autistic UK believes that O’Mara’s resignation from the Labour Party, and his continuation to serve as an MP for Sheffield Hallam, is a failing on his part to uphold his role to represent his constituents, his party, and to autistic people as a whole.

As a representative of the UK, O’Mara – like all MPs – is to be held responsible for his past and present actions by the public. Whilst, as stated, his actions were not necessarily “criminal”, to excuse discriminatory actions in the form of harassment and victimisation online as such is disgraceful.

There is a notable difference between behaviour that is considered “poor” because autistic people misunderstand a society that does not work for them, and discrimination. There’s a notable difference between laughing during a cinema screening and discriminating against women and LGBTQ+ people. Discriminatory, cruel and vindictive behaviour is not due to an autistic person’s relationship with society and is, like neurotypical people, entirely upon themselves.

Autistic UK stands against all forms of discrimination. We will never condone an individual using their place in one discriminated group as an excuse, however veiled, to discriminate against others.

It is true that people do change and a person should not solely be judged by their past. However, any individual must be held responsible for their past actions if they have not openly done so already. To refuse to acknowledge your past only causes more harm to those you have harmed and failed.

Through his recent actions, he has – whether consciously or not – made his prior comments, his resignation, and his treatment by the party as a whole, about being autistic. A decision that undermines autistic and disabled people as a whole.

Using your place within the autistic community – or any marginalised community – to excuse discrimination is incredibly dangerous and is a method used widely within certain circles to excuse white, often male, violence against women. Using the fact you are autistic as an excuse for poor behaviour only serves to damage the reputation of all autistic people.

It is deeply hypocritical to accuse a political party of not sharing a “commitment to the true definition of equality and compassion” when suspended for misogynistic and homophobic comments that go against the exact beliefs stated.

The fact an individual is disabled, mentally ill, neurodivergent or a mixture of these neither explains or excuses behaviour that is abhorrent, and O’Mara’s unwillingness to accept a formal warning and attend any form of training shows an unwillingness to accept and learn from his past wrongdoings.

We, too, would like to suggest reading about autism. However, we would also particularly like to highlight the use of autism and autistic people as a scapegoat for wider discrimination.