An Appeal to Stop the Inhumane Deportation of Gopul Anand

by Errol Kerr and Kat Humble

Gopul Anand, 23, is fascinated by computers. He loves to explore science, music and art and has an immense interest in learning as much as he possibly can about the world. His brother, currently studying computer science at university, shares information on what he is studying with him as well as playing the odd video game or two.

Gopul is an autistic and multiply disabled young man currently living in Oxford with his father and mother and his younger brother visits him during term-breaks and weekends. He receives round-the-clock care from his family after his health deteriorated drastically in 2013. He was sent to an ATU (Assessment and Treatment Unit) in 2015. After 10 months, his family were forced to go through a mental health tribunal to have him released and Gopul still struggles with nightmares and flashbacks about his experience there.

Due to his many conditions (autism, learning disability, epilepsy and schizophrenia), Gopul needs a significant amount of care. His medication often leaves him sedated to such an extent that he is unable to carry out a regular daily routine without support. He is assisted by two support workers when he needs to use public transport or go shopping. Feelings of anxiety manifest in outbursts and meltdowns, but Gopul often finds ways to stim in order to stem these.

Visa Troubles and Stress

Gopul’s family moved to the UK as his father, Shekhar, started working at Oxfam on a five-year intra-company transfer visa. This had previously been extended and was to extend further, as Oxfam were hoping to keep Shekhar working with them due to his immense experience and talents. However, as the rules around visa extensions changed as part of the policy on immigration, Shekar and his family were planning to return to India. Unfortunately, after Gopul’s health deteriorated in 2013, it is now impossible for him to travel safely.

Medical professionals, including his doctor and social worker, have stated that Gopul is unfit to travel, and that both his safety and the safety of the other passengers would be at risk should he have to leave his current environment. Should Gopul be forced to leave the UK, his family and medical professionals report that not only would his condition will suffer irreparable damage and extreme anxiety, but it could also make him dangerous to other passengers during travel, also affecting his mental health and well-being in the long run.

His current care plan has been thrown into uncertainty because of the protracted situation with the Home Office. Gopul and his social workers have spent many months building trust and a strong relationship with one another and, after his experiences in the ATU, family support is key. Gopul’s friends, family, medical team and possessions are all here, in the UK. Here, he is in a safe environment with appropriate support and medical treatment. This support would be unavailable should Gopul and his family be forced to leave.

Human Rights Violation

Because his health conditions are not obviously physical – i.e. either because they are invisible disabilities or mental health conditions, the Home Office has elected to ignore all medical evidence provided. The family’s solicitor, Sugina Mehra, affirmed that the level of medical evidence supplied by Gopul’s psychiatrist and social worker was ample. This, of course, is a grave breach of Gopul’s human right to not be discriminated against because of his disabilities. Disabilities should not have to be visible to be counted as real.

This situation has deeply affected his mental health. He has stopped attending regular social groups due to the intense stress he feels about his family’s situation and he is now less able to control his impulsive behaviour as his stress increases. Gopul considers the UK his home. It has been his home for the past seven years.

Please Help

We are hoping that, by publicising his case, it will encourage the general public to contact the Home Office and their MPs to register their disgust at the decision and to state their support for Gopul and his family. We are also hoping that you will sign the petition at https://www.change.org/p/home-office-please-don-t-force-my-severely-disabled-son-to-leave-uk?recruiter=410764766&utm_source=share_petition&utm_medium=copylink&utm_campaign=share_petition to join the thousands who have already signed it to show their support. Thank you.

International Day of Disabled Persons 2018

by Errol Kerr 

It’s the International Day of Disabled Persons, and I don’t know what to say anymore. I was hoping to write something far more professional – but this day doesn’t feel like it’s ours anymore.

I’ve spent most of the day thinking about what precisely to talk about today in regard to autism and disability. I could use this time to talk about how media representation of autistic people is consistently poor, how it’s a symptom of the consistently poor representation of disabled people within the media. I could talk about how multiply-disabled people still find it hard to find their place within the autistic movement, how we’re still pretty dominated by white, cis-gender, male, straight and able individuals outside of social media. I could talk about how we are still forced to ‘debate’ whether autism, and other neurodivergent conditions, are in fact disabilities, or how we’re still bogged down in this needless conflict over person-first and identity-first language, when our views across the community are clear.

But I’ll do all of those throughout the month. Today, I’m going to take this day, tear it apart and put it back together.

We’re talked about but aren’t given the chance to speak. Businesses flash their purple emblems and their Disability Confident labels, whilst we can’t find work with them and they refuse to develop policies and implement support that actually allows disabled people to be a part of their workplace. Governments promote this day and show support our causes as they cut welfare and support. Charities laud this day whilst they put children like us in solitary units, forcing families apart and destroying our physical and mental well-being. Parents still want to cure those who do not want fixing, putting us through medically sanctioned torture in order to make us “normal” to them.

I recently had a conversation with a close friend about business events like “Purple Tuesdays” and “Autism Hours”. How, to me, they feel patronising and that it makes disabled people feel like they only exist for one day to these places. How autistic people and other neurodivergent people feel they’re allowed to shop by abled people for an hour every so often. How it’s another example of how our needs are only met when it’s convenient.

How this is an example of how we’re often treated in education – if funding isn’t there, if we’re doing academically okay, we won’t find support. How documents supporting educational support can be so easily taken away from disabled and neurodivergent young people. How this is a cruel way to make us realise that this is the life we’ll live, and how whether it’s an EHCP as a child, PIP as an adult, pensions as we get older, we’ve got to constantly fight just to have our needs recognised, never mind actually supported.

How do we feel comfortable supporting an international day of disabled people when people can’t even say “disabled”, or when “autistic” is a dirty word, a slur used across the board online and in public? We have to crowdfund to get access to materials that we need to survive – and people think lighting up purple is enough?

I’m multiply-disabled. For me that includes being autistic amongst other things. Today doesn’t feel like my day any more. I want to see and support disabled people, not companies with purple t-shirts. I want to see access improvements across the board. I want to see autism recognised as something acceptable globally. I want to discuss autism as something that’s more than white – because it is overwhelmingly white people like myself leading these conversations, and I recognise that.

This day is about us – our rights, our experiences. Outside of social media, it doesn’t feel anything like that. We’re an amazing bunch, and we exist every other day of the year.

I want any autistic and/or disabled person to use this post to promote themselves in any way possible. Tweet us (@AutisticUK) a link to your work or what you like to do. Join our Facebook group (Neurodiverse UK) and share your story on accessing benefits or accommodations. Email us (info@autisticuk.org) to send us a blog post for our web site to discuss disability and autism. We want this to be your space; your network. We want to promote you.